Abolition of Slavery in the 19th Century

Paper Info
Page count 2
Word count 562
Read time 3 min
Topic Sociology
Type Coursework
Language 🇺🇸 US

Introduction: Gradual Emancipation in the Era of Slavery

There is no need to stress that any relationships based on inequality of the participants involved in social, economic, or political interactions are doomed to be inefficient and unethical. By allowing a specific segment of the population to exploit others, one subverts not only essential democratic ideas but also key principles of the human decency (Marable 17). Therefore, the ideas of emancipation must be heralded as the foundation for interactions in the American society. To introduce all members of the American society to the concept of equality and, thus, abolish slavery, one must use gradual emancipation. Thus, the shock value of a social change will be reduced significantly, and innovative principles of social interactions will be accepted more willingly.

Gradual Emancipation and Social Adjustment

The issue of interpersonal relationships, in general, and communication between the oppressed and the dominant demographics within the community is, perhaps, one of the most complicated problems to be addressed. To adjust to the social change and build relationships with the rest of the American society, the oppressed population will need a significant amount of time. Herein lies the importance of using gradual emancipation. The identified tool will relieve African American people of the cultural shock that they are most likely to experience (Young 123).

Economic Implications of Gradual Emancipation

The significance of gradual emancipation cannot possibly be underrated when it comes to considering the economic implications of the identified social change. Indeed, it would be wrong to assume that the people that have been experiencing oppression for the entirety of their lives will immediately acquire the skills and savvy necessary to become financially successful and survive in the American economy. One could make an argument that being observant and smart is an acquired skill that all people can develop. For instance, Frederick Douglass provides a rather profound commentary on the economic state of the situation in which he found himself: “Everything implied stern truth, solid purpose, and rigid economy” (338). However, it would be wrong to expect people to become instantly aware of the economic conditions in which they will live. Therefore, it is necessary to introduce the members of the oppressed population to the concept of emancipation gradually.

Although the legal aspects of the emancipation process can be altered comparatively fast, they will, nevertheless, require time to settle in the community. Unless the principles of social justice are changed as well, the reinforcement of emancipation will have no tangible effects on the relationships between African Americans and the rest of the American population. Consequently, the application of the gradual emancipation techniques is imperative to the further success of the abolition movement.

Conclusion: Gradual Emancipation and Integration Opportunities

Any relationships that are not based on the ideas of equality and democracy must be deemed as alien to the society. However, the process of introducing the members of the oppressed ethnicities to the modern society is fraught with numerous challenges, including economic, political, social, and legal ones. Therefore, changes must be implemented gradually and very carefully. As soon as the oppressed demographics adjust to the alterations, further reinforcement of equality principles and the redesign of the social justice ideas will become a possibility. Until then, it is the duty of the American society to create the environment in which the target population will feel secure.

Works Cited

Douglass, Frederick. The Life and Times of Frederick Douglass. Brigham Young University, 1881.

Marable, Manning. Let Nobody Turn Us Around: Voices of Resistance, Reform, and Renewal. Rowman & Littlefield, 2003.

Young, Ralph. Dissent: The History of an American Idea. NYU Press, 2015.

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EssaysInCollege. (2022, May 24). Abolition of Slavery in the 19th Century. Retrieved from https://essaysincollege.com/abolition-of-slavery-in-the-19th-century/

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EssaysInCollege. (2022, May 24). Abolition of Slavery in the 19th Century. https://essaysincollege.com/abolition-of-slavery-in-the-19th-century/

Work Cited

"Abolition of Slavery in the 19th Century." EssaysInCollege, 24 May 2022, essaysincollege.com/abolition-of-slavery-in-the-19th-century/.

References

EssaysInCollege. (2022) 'Abolition of Slavery in the 19th Century'. 24 May.

References

EssaysInCollege. 2022. "Abolition of Slavery in the 19th Century." May 24, 2022. https://essaysincollege.com/abolition-of-slavery-in-the-19th-century/.

1. EssaysInCollege. "Abolition of Slavery in the 19th Century." May 24, 2022. https://essaysincollege.com/abolition-of-slavery-in-the-19th-century/.


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EssaysInCollege. "Abolition of Slavery in the 19th Century." May 24, 2022. https://essaysincollege.com/abolition-of-slavery-in-the-19th-century/.