Hemodynamic Monitoring and Peripheral Intravenous Catheters

Paper Info
Page count 2
Word count 2248
Read time 6 min
Topic Education
Type Essay
Language 🇺🇸 US

Purpose

  1. The first course will focus on teaching hemodynamic monitoring and hemodynamic instability in critically ill patients. The course will include a review of the cardiopulmonary system, appropriate methods for monitoring, causes of hemodynamic instability, and the nurses’ role within the team dynamic in regards to proper hemodynamic monitoring.
  2. The placement of peripheral intravenous (IV) catheters is a routine part of most patients’ hospital stay. As such, the second course will focus on providing nurses with an understanding of all aspects of IV therapy. Some of the main components that will be of interest to the course include fluid and electrolytes balance, information about the venous system, medical terminology, various means of access to deliver IV therapy, different catheter types and their use, complications associated with IVs, different types of IV equipment, accurate administration of IV medications and IV solutions, caring for patients with IV therapy, parenteral nutrition, and blood components administration (Malyon et al., 2014).

Hospital Philosophy

Temple University Hospital’s philosophy is founded on the commitment to support the highest quality teaching and training, as well as clinical research for healthcare students and professionals (Mission and vision, 2015). The Temple University Hospital is a major academic university in the heart of Philadelphia. The primary population served in this area is African American and Hispanic/Latino. This course will support this philosophy by teaching new nurses the appropriate skills required to monitor critically ill patients in the intensive care unit. After the completion of this course, students will be able to not only describe the setup for hemodynamic monitoring but also to evaluate the treatment modalities for the hemodynamically unstable patient (Willingham, Hughes, & Dobolyi, 2015). As already stated, the peripheral intravenous catheter placement course will provide nurses with an understanding of all aspects of IV therapy and the complications involved.

Assessment

The target audience consists of new-to-practice nurses hired within the last six months to work in the intensive care unit. The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) describes typical duties that include working directly with critically ill patients. It is important for novice nurses working with critically ill patients to complete additional training in order to become effective in assessing patient conditions and administering appropriate treatment plans (Wollerton & Swiers, 2016). Specifically, new nurses need to learn how to use advanced life support equipment and technology-oriented monitoring devices, how to insert peripheral intravenous catheters, and how to advocate for the unique needs of critically ill patients. I would like to teach the described courses because novice nurses are not sufficiently trained during their school years. Research is consistent that, when novice nurses get hired to work in critical care settings, they are often unable to undertake peripheral intravenous techniques correctly, resulting in poor patient outcomes (Conway, Rolley, Page, & Fulbrook, 2014; Wollerton & Swiers, 2016). This realization sparked my interest to teach the two courses in order to provide the new nurses with hands-on training that will be instrumental in deciding how well they will perform in actual practice settings.

Learning Styles

In an effort to abide by the Temple University Hospital’s commitment to excellence through teaching, I will incorporate various teaching strategies to appeal to varying learning styles within the two courses. Specifically, I will utilize teaching tools such as PowerPoint presentations, home-reading assignments with discussion, and real-time demonstrations of essential procedures to teach the two courses. I will do this to not only appeal to the most common learning styles (visual, auditory, and kinesthetic) but also to ensure that students are able to take in and process information in different ways by seeing and hearing, reflecting and acting, reasoning logically and intuitively, analyzing, as well as steadily and in fits and starts (Hanson & Carpenter, 2011). This is in the realization of the fact that teaching and learning styles vary, hence the need to adopt a multidimensional approach to ensure that the needs and demands of the students are taken into consideration (Parra, 2016).

Program Outcome

The student will be able to demonstrate all the necessary skills, knowledge, and behaviors they acquire in the four-hour, two-course program. Additionally, it is expected that the student will develop the capacity to apply the knowledge and skills learned to real-life practice environments. It is also expected that the student will develop appropriate communication skills through exposure to teaching styles such as discussion, video simulations, PowerPoint presentations, case studies, and oral presentations. Lastly, it is expected that the student will develop the capacity to identify the relevant information according to hospital policy.

Learner objectives

Hemodynamic Monitoring Learning Objectives

Cognitive: After attending the two-hour class, the student will be able to describe hemodynamic monitoring (HM) and list two different types of catheters that can be used in intensive care settings

Affective: The student will demonstrate a positive increase in self-efficacy beliefs on how to undertake HM, as well as show an increase in knowledge of hemodynamic instability (HI) that affects patients in intensive care settings

Psychomotor: The student will differentiate how two management techniques can help decrease HI incidence through the use of the learned clinical skills and lab scenarios. Additionally, the learner will be able to demonstrate the hands-on application of at least two skills that could be used to decrease HI incidence in intensive care settings.

Peripheral Intravenous Catheterization Learning Objectives

Cognitive: The student will identify indications for IV therapy in intensive care practice settings, including at least three best practices for catheter insertion as depicted in the hospital’s policy and procedure manual

Affective: The student will demonstrate compliance with the IV therapy and its components, as well as internalize at least two different complications associated with IVs from a clinical perspective.

Psychomotor: Through the use of a manikin, the student will demonstrate hands-on application knowledge by inserting the intravenous catheter into the correct arterial or venous systems (Gilakjani, 2012).

Lesson plan 1Lesson plan 1Lesson plan 1Lesson plan 1Lesson plan 2Lesson plan 2Lesson plan 2Lesson plan 2

References

Conway, A., Rolley, J., Page, K., & Fulbrook, P. (2014). Issues and challenges associated with nurse-administered procedural sedation and analgesia in the cardiac catheterization laboratory: A qualitative study. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 23, 374-384. Web.

Gilakjani, A. (2012). Visual, auditory, kinesthetic learning styles and their impacts on English language teaching. Journal of Studies in Education, 2(1), 104-113. Web.

Hanson, M.J.S., & Carpenter, D.R. (2011). Integrating cooperative learning into classroom testing: Implications for nursing education & practice. Nursing Education Perspectives, 32, 270-273. Web.

Jackson, D., Hickman, L.D., Power, T., Disler, R., Potgieter, I., Deek, H., & Davidson, P.M. (2014). Small group learning: Graduate health students’ views of challenges and benefits. Contemporary Nurse: A Journal of the Australian Nursing Profession, 48(1), 117-1280. Web.

Malyon, L., Ullman, A.J., Phillips, N., Young, J., Kleidon, T., Murfield, J., & Rickard, C.M. (2014). Peripheral intravenous catheters duration and failure in pediatric acute care: A prospective cohort study. Emergency Medicine Australasia, 26, 602-608. Web.

Mission and vision. (2015). Web.

Parra, B. (2016). Learning strategies and styles as a basis for building personal learning environments. International Journal of Educational Technology in Higher Education, 13(4), 1-11. Web.

Tofade, T., Elsner, J., & Haines, S.T. (2013). Best practice strategies for effective use of questions as a teaching tool. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 77, 155-163. Web.

Willingham, D. T., Hughes, E. M., & Dobolyi, D. G. (2015). The scientific status of learning styles theories. Teaching of Psychology, 42, 266-271. Web.

Wollerton, C., & Swiers, D. (2016). Where will our practice nurses come from? Practice Nurse, 46, 20-13. Web.

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Reference

EssaysInCollege. (2022, May 24). Hemodynamic Monitoring and Peripheral Intravenous Catheters. Retrieved from https://essaysincollege.com/hemodynamic-monitoring-and-peripheral-intravenous-catheters/

Reference

EssaysInCollege. (2022, May 24). Hemodynamic Monitoring and Peripheral Intravenous Catheters. https://essaysincollege.com/hemodynamic-monitoring-and-peripheral-intravenous-catheters/

Work Cited

"Hemodynamic Monitoring and Peripheral Intravenous Catheters." EssaysInCollege, 24 May 2022, essaysincollege.com/hemodynamic-monitoring-and-peripheral-intravenous-catheters/.

References

EssaysInCollege. (2022) 'Hemodynamic Monitoring and Peripheral Intravenous Catheters'. 24 May.

References

EssaysInCollege. 2022. "Hemodynamic Monitoring and Peripheral Intravenous Catheters." May 24, 2022. https://essaysincollege.com/hemodynamic-monitoring-and-peripheral-intravenous-catheters/.

1. EssaysInCollege. "Hemodynamic Monitoring and Peripheral Intravenous Catheters." May 24, 2022. https://essaysincollege.com/hemodynamic-monitoring-and-peripheral-intravenous-catheters/.


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EssaysInCollege. "Hemodynamic Monitoring and Peripheral Intravenous Catheters." May 24, 2022. https://essaysincollege.com/hemodynamic-monitoring-and-peripheral-intravenous-catheters/.